Blueberry focaccia

P1080805Blueberries are now in full season and currently gracing the stands at my local market. To my great delight, they are proving to be a big hit with my 14 month old daughter.  Just when you think she’s had a good serving of them, she’ll point to the bowl they’re in on the table and say ‘iss’ (I presume she means ‘this’) to indicate she wants more! I’m perfectly happy to oblige. I have no complaints at all if she wants seconds (and thirds!) of fruit and veggies.

Anyway, a couple of years ago, I made a cherry focaccia and I remember thinking that it would work well with blueberries too. Here is how I made my blueberry focaccia (or focaccia ai mirtilli as they say here) yesterday:


  • 550 g strong bread flour
  • 300 g milk
  • 200 g blueberries
  • 50 g butter, plus extra for coating
  • 10 g active dried yeast
  • 60 g sugar, plus extra for coating
  • 1 teaspoon salt


  1. Mix milk, butter, sugar and yeast in bowl (Thermomix: 3 min./ 37  C/ Speed. 2).
  2. Add flour and salt. Knead for 3 minutes.
  3. Transfer dough into a large bowl and cover with cling film or a damp tea-towel. Leave to rise in a warm place until dough has doubled in size (about 2-3 hours).
  4. Preheat oven to 180 C.
  5. Grease pizza trays[1] with butter.
  6. Remove risen dough from bowl with well-dusted hands and place on a clean and lightly-dusted work surface. Flatten dough delicately (it should be at least 1 cm thick) and form a circle (or rectangle, depending on shape of tray) with it.
  7. Lay dough onto trays.
  8. Using a silicone pastry brush, coat focaccia with melted butter[2].
  9. Lay blueberries on focaccia.
  10. Sprinkle sugar liberally on top of focaccia.
  11. Bake in the oven for 25-30 minutes.

[1] I used two circular trays with a 26.5cm diameter.

[2] an egg yolk or milk could be used to coat your focaccia instead.



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